Katie Ledecky won four medals for Team USA in Tokyo. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

Katie Ledecky is on the move.

The seven-time Olympic gold medalist announced Wednesday that she has decided to relocate her training base from Stanford to Florida.

“I’ve decided to train at the University of Florida with Coach Anthony Nesty and the outstanding mid-distance and distance training group there,” she wrote on Twitter. “I’m looking forward to the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in the next phase of my swimming career.

“My years at Stanford have been nothing short of incredible. I’m so grateful for my coach Greg Meehan, as well as my teammates, professors, friends, and everyone in the larger Palo Alto/Menlo Park area who have supported me through these years.”

While many thought she could be moving back to Washington D.C. to train under Bruce Gemmell, the move makes sense when considering who currently trains under Nesty. Nesty’s group includes the world’s No. 1 male distance swimmer in Bobby Finke. Finke shocked the world in Tokyo when he won both the 1,500- and 800-meter freestyles. Kieran Smith, bronze medalist in the 400-meter freestyle, also trains under Nesty.

Thus, Ledecky will be joining an elite group of distance swimmers training under a coach who helped to get them there.

It’s a move that comes after Ledecky lost her first individual Olympic event in Tokyo in the 400-meter freestyle. Australia’s Ariarne Titmus took home gold whilst Ledecky earned silver. Additionally, Ledecky missed out on the podium in the 200-meter freestyle.

But the 24-year-old has no plans to retire anytime soon, saying as much in a post-competition press conference in Tokyo.

“I kind of laughed at the retirement thing today because I was surprised that that word even came up because I think I’ve been pretty clear that 2024 is in the picture for me,” she said. “I’d bring 2028 up but I want to make it clear that I’m not promising anything.

“I want to go to Paris and I want to keep representing our country at this level. It would be an honor to go to a fourth Games and it would be an honor to go to a fifth Games and compete on home soil. I know how unique that is and how special that is to the people that get to do that. It’s out there. Maybe I’ll just be in the stands in L.A., who knows?”