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Vlatko Andonovski contract details: Time is ticking for USWNT coach

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(Brad Smith/USSF/Getty Images for USSF)

The U.S. women’s national team’s World Cup run has come to a historically disappointing finish, which has head coach Vlatko Andonovski on the hot seat.

Andonvoski took the helm in 2019, succeeding two-time World Cup-winning coach Jill Ellis. The 46-year-old has coached the USWNT through two major tournaments, the Tokyo Olympics in 2021 and the World Cup this year, but did not lead the team past the semifinals in either. And the early World Cup exit from the World Cup featured a record scoring drought.

Taken together, these results could spell the end to Andonovski’s tenure with the USWNT. His contract expires at the end of the calendar year, as U.S. Soccer confirmed to Yahoo Sports. So the national federation could run out the clock on the deal, or Andonovski could step down or be fired before then. (U.S. Soccer also could extend Andonovski’s contract, though such a move seems unlikely.)

In 2019, Andonovski signed a four-year deal worth approximately $400,000 per year. In 2022, he earned $446,495 – which included $50,000 in bonuses for a bronze-medal finish at the Tokyo Olympics.

Over three years with the USWNT, Andonovski has a record of 51-9-5. He’s faced plenty of criticism for his team’s performances, which included a three-game losing streak late last year – the program’s first since 1993. And at the World Cup, the team went on a historic scoring drought, which now stands at 238 minutes, the longest in USWNT World Cup history.

Yet Andonovski is not worrying about his job status, he said Sunday. Instead, his focus is on the players.

“I think it’s selfish to think about me, my future, what I’m gonna do, when we have 20-year-old players going through the moment, going through this situation,” he said. “I want be there for them. I love them. I love them all. And they’re my players, but they’re my friends. We spent four years together. They got their first caps with me. They got their first national team call-ups with me. We spend times, tough times, good times. So I don’t want to see them like that. That’s all I think about.”