Former Racing Louisville coach Christy Holly was fired for cause in August 2021. (Joe Robbins/ISI Photos/Getty Images)

New details regarding the firing of former Racing Louisville coach Christy Holly emerged Monday as part of U.S. Soccer’s investigation into abuse and misconduct in the National Women’s Soccer League.

The investigation, spearheaded by former attorney general Sally Q. Yates, uncovered claims of abuse leveled against Holly by former Racing player Erin Simon.

Holly requested a one-on-one film session with Simon in April 2021, according to the report. “When she arrived, she recalls Holly opened his laptop and began the game film,” the report states, adding that Holly told her he would touch her for every bad pass she made. Holly then “pushed his hands down her pants and up her shirt,” according to the report.

“She tried to tightly cross her legs and push him away, laughing to avoid angering him,” the report states. “The video ended, and she left. When her teammate picked her up to drive home, Simon broke down crying.”

In a separate incident outlined in the investigation, Holly requested that Simon meet him at his home to review game film. The coach showed her pornography instead and masturbated in front of her before she left.

The report also includes claims that Holly sent Simon explicit photos.

Racing Louisville abruptly parted ways with Holly in August 2021, firing the coach for cause. The club did not elaborate on the factors that led to Holly’s firing.

According to U.S. Soccer’s report, Racing Louisville blocked former and current club employees from commenting on Holly, failing to cooperate with the investigation.

“Louisville has also declined to provide our investigation with any information concerning Holly’s employment, claiming that mutual non-disclosure and non-disparagement agreements signed with Holly prevent them from providing any information at all about his tenure with the team,” the report reads.

“As a result, Holly’s misconduct has remained largely unknown, including to anyone who might seek to employ him as a coach.”

Read more: