A fan holds up a sign in support of the USWNT's fight for equal pay at the 2020 SheBelieves Cup. (Ira L. Black/Getty Images)

With Tuesday’s win against Iran, the U.S. men’s national team guaranteed itself a spot in the Round of 16 at the World Cup in Qatar. It also guaranteed a big payday for itself and the USWNT.

The U.S. men’s and women’s national teams closed their pay gap when they agreed to historic collective bargaining agreements with the U.S. Soccer Federation in May. The agreements run through 2028 and guarantee equal World Cup prize money for both sides.

With the 1-0 victory against Iran to close out the group stage, the USMNT elevated its World Cup payout to at least $13 million, the prize money guaranteed to each team reaching the knockout stage. Split down the middle, that would give the men’s and women’s teams $6.5 million each.

The USWNT received $2 million in prize money for winning the 2015 World Cup, and then received $4 million for winning the 2019 World Cup, for $6 million total. So the women’s team would earn more for the 2022 men’s World Cup than for its last two title runs, as Lindsay Gibbs reported in her Power Plays newsletter.

That calculation does not account for U.S. Soccer’s cut of the winnings. For the 2022 men’s World Cup, the federation will take a 10% cut, and then ”90% of World Cup prize money will be pooled and shared equally between rostered World Cup players for the WNT and MNT,” per the new CBAs – which would give the USWNT and USMNT $5.85 million each.

The USMNT could increase that payout by advancing deeper into the tournament. Teams that reach the quarterfinals earn $17 million. The fourth-place team wins $25 million; third place, $27 million; second place, $30 million; and the winner, $42 million.

The 2022 men’s World Cup purse totals $440 million overall, up from $400 million in 2018. The 2019 women’s World Cup had a total purse of $30 million, up from $15 million in 2015. The purse has not been announced for the 2023 women’s tournament.